Nashville, TN, USA

©2017 by Jen Holloway.

Historical Fiction

Creative Writing Sample

Bridget followed the stout and surly woman up the two flights of stairs, her case in tow.  The woman ascended the stairs ahead of the maid, speaking all the while without so much as a glance back to ensure the young woman was listening.  “You shall call me and my husband by our proper names at all times, and our daughters Miss Emma and Miss Lizzie, do you understand?”  The woman continued without pause, “You are a spinster I take it.  We are God fearing people and there will be no men on this property unless employed or invited by my husband or myself, do you understand?  If we find you unscrupulous we will put you out without pay, and you won’t find other work in this town I can assure you.  Here are your quarters.  I expect you in the kitchen in five minutes to prepare dinner.”

            Bridget entered the room, and the woman left without a glance, closing the door behind her with force.  She surveyed the room.  The ceiling was sloped but the room large, and there was a window beside the narrow bed.  These lodgings were a vast improvement over her room at the Reed house, which had been in the cellar by Mr. Reed’s design.  She imagined she might find a good breeze during the heat of summer and was happy with the room and to be in a new house.  She put on her apron and made her way downstairs to the kitchen. 

            As Bridget entered the kitchen, a woman was bringing in dresses from the line outside.  She looked Bridget up and down.  “Oh good, you are here.  I shall leave this in the guest room for you to iron.  Let me know when you are finished, and I’ll hang them in my room”, the woman said moving through the kitchen without introducing herself. She assumed this must be one of the young mistresses of the house.  

            “That is our eldest girl, Miss Emma to you.  Now here is the larder and you will find bowls in here and all the sundries.  Let me know when you are low on dry goods and I’ll arrange for them from the store.”  The woman continued with her instructions, showing Bridget where she could find everything she needed for preparing dinner, including the larder, and the washroom in the cellar.  The family were one of the richest in town, if the gossip of the other maids was to be believed, but they still had no electrics or running water in the house.  It was no wonder they had hired Bridget, if the man of the house was as skinflint as people said, after the trouble she’d had at the Reed house.  Still, she would happily take the inconveniences over Mr. Reed’s unwanted attentions. 

            Bridget made the family dinner and served it in the dining room per the Mrs.’ instructions.  It had been only the Mr., the Mrs. And Miss Emma that evening.  The younger daughter had been out for the evening, as she was on many nights.  She did not share the prudence of the rest of the family and often moved in society circles by all accounts.  Bridget had a plate of cold vegetables and meat from the previous day’s evening meal by herself in the kitchen before cleaning up the family meal.  Tired from a day full of instructions to remember, she went up to her room to put her things in order and turn in. 

 

Historical Fiction

Creative Writing Sample

Bridget followed the stout and surly woman up the two flights of stairs, her case in tow.  The woman ascended the stairs ahead of the maid, speaking all the while without so much as a glance back to ensure the young woman was listening.  “You shall call me and my husband by our proper names at all times, and our daughters Miss Emma and Miss Lizzie, do you understand?”  The woman continued without pause, “You are a spinster I take it.  We are God fearing people and there will be no men on this property unless employed or invited by my husband or myself, do you understand?  If we find you unscrupulous we will put you out without pay, and you won’t find other work in this town I can assure you.  Here are your quarters.  I expect you in the kitchen in five minutes to prepare dinner.”

            Bridget entered the room, and the woman left without a glance, closing the door behind her with force.  She surveyed the room.  The ceiling was sloped but the room large, and there was a window beside the narrow bed.  These lodgings were a vast improvement over her room at the Reed house, which had been in the cellar by Mr. Reed’s design.  She imagined she might find a good breeze during the heat of summer and was happy with the room and to be in a new house.  She put on her apron and made her way downstairs to the kitchen. 

            As Bridget entered the kitchen, a woman was bringing in dresses from the line outside.  She looked Bridget up and down.  “Oh good, you are here.  I shall leave this in the guest room for you to iron.  Let me know when you are finished, and I’ll hang them in my room”, the woman said moving through the kitchen without introducing herself. She assumed this must be one of the young mistresses of the house.  

            “That is our eldest girl, Miss Emma to you.  Now here is the larder and you will find bowls in here and all the sundries.  Let me know when you are low on dry goods and I’ll arrange for them from the store.”  The woman continued with her instructions, showing Bridget where she could find everything she needed for preparing dinner, including the larder, and the washroom in the cellar.  The family were one of the richest in town, if the gossip of the other maids was to be believed, but they still had no electrics or running water in the house.  It was no wonder they had hired Bridget, if the man of the house was as skinflint as people said, after the trouble she’d had at the Reed house.  Still, she would happily take the inconveniences over Mr. Reed’s unwanted attentions. 

            Bridget made the family dinner and served it in the dining room per the Mrs.’ instructions.  It had been only the Mr., the Mrs. And Miss Emma that evening.  The younger daughter had been out for the evening, as she was on many nights.  She did not share the prudence of the rest of the family and often moved in society circles by all accounts.  Bridget had a plate of cold vegetables and meat from the previous day’s evening meal by herself in the kitchen before cleaning up the family meal.  Tired from a day full of instructions to remember, she went up to her room to put her things in order and turn in.